June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

Photo Credit: Pixabay

                                                                                                                          Photo Credit: Pixabay

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. Worldwide, there are at least 44.4 million people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia’s. Dementia is a non-communicable disease and one of the main health challenges for the elderly in continents such as Africa and Asia. The current health systems of these continents are not designed to meet such chronic care needs, hence dementia is set to become a major problem in the long run.

The World Alzheimer report 2013, from Alzheimer’s Disease International, estimated that by 2050 the number of people living with dementia would rise from 44.4 million to 135.5 million. The proportion living in low- and middle-income countries would rise from 62% to 71% therefore much of the increase will be in developing countries. If current population trends continue, the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease will increase significantly unless the disease can be effectively treated or prevented. The increase in population aging is also linked to Alzheimer’s since the risk of Alzheimer’s increases with age. China, India, and their south Asian and western Pacific neighbors are the fastest growth in the elderly population.
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and may contribute to 60–70% of cases and dementia is one of the most common diseases among elderly people. It is a leading cause of disability, institutionalization, and mortality; therefore it has a tremendous impact on both the individual and society. This month, there are many ways to help raise awareness and inspire action. These include:

  • Talk about Alzheimer’s each time you meet other people
  • Post, tweet and share the facts about Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia’s
  • Show your commitment to the cause by wearing purple, the official color of the Alzheimer’s movement

According to World Health Organization, health systems around the world, especially in Africa and Asia need to adapt to meet the chronic care needs of the elderly as the shift to aging populations gathers pace in low- and middle-income countries in the world. As populations age rapidly, infrastructure must be put in place to address the needs of elderly with dementia. The United Kingdom is a great example because they are leading the way in tackling the global crisis of dementia. These are not limited to websites about dementia, books that raise awareness of dementia among young people, or hosting the 2013 G8 Dementia Summit in London. The 2013 G8 Dementia Summit launched the World Dementia Council that exists to stimulate innovation, development and commercialization of life enhancing drugs, treatments and care for people with dementia, or at risk of dementia, within a generation.

This June, let’s observe Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. Everyone who has a brain is at risk to develop Alzheimer’s – but everyone can help to fight it, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. The goal is for the public to get involved and hopefully end Alzheimer’s disease.

Sophie Okolo is the Founder of Global Health Aging.

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