Tag Archives: Children

One Child: The Story of China’s Most Radical Experiment

One Child: The Story of China’s Most Radical Experiment by Mei Fong presents a compelling analysis of the impact of China’s “One-Child Policy” on older adults. The one-child policy, a compelling story of population control for economic growth, has long term implications that are only now apparent. Fong describes the challenges of a rapidly aging population as she focuses on families who are struggling to care for older adults, and those who have no children to care for them in old age.

Published November 2015

One of the book’s most gripping stories is of parents during the 2008 Sichun earthquake. According to official reports, “eight thousand families lost their only children in the disaster.” (p.3) These parents, and other parents who have lost their only children, face barriers in accessing nursing homes, health care, and burial plots. Fong notes, “they are also more financially vulnerable than ordinary retirees, and more prone to depression, studies show.” (p. 41) While these challenges are tangible, the emotional challenges of losing support systems in old age is also a prominent problem. Fong addresses the growth of China’s hospice industry, stating that many older adults without family feel unable to contribute to society. (p.151)

The book also digs into the cultural complexities in aging and filial obligation. In one notable story, that received national acclaim in china, Liu Ting brought his mother with him to college, when she was too ill to care for herself. His mother suffered from kidney disease and uremia. Although Ting received fame and attention, his job opportunities after college were limited at the expense and time required to properly care for his mother. (p. 92)

While Fong discusses other implications of China’s one-child policy such as rise in adoptions, increase in bride prices to compensate for the greater number of men than women, and the further consequences of sex-selective abortions, the primary implications of the policy relate to the care and treatment of older adults. With only one child per two aging parents, the traditional way of caring for Chinese parents will cause economic slow down, and place burdens on the younger generation.

Fong is at the forefront of a wave of journalism that will detail the challenges of aging in China. She acknowledged that it could be difficult to find many children who were burdened by caring for aging parents, as more parents of children from this time period are in their 50’s and 60’s (p. 86) However, her book is at the forefront of a problem that will only become more prominent in the coming decades.

Grace Mandel is pursuing a Master of Public Health in Health Systems and Policy at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.


The Dementia Diaries: A Great Resource for Dementia Awareness Week

In honor of Dementia Awareness Week held May 15-21, Emma Barrett, Programme Manager for Social Innovation Lab Kent (SILK), and Matthew Snyman, Author of The Dementia Diaries, have written a great piece about The Dementia Diaries. The book a collection of stories about young people and their experience with dementia.

Dementia. It does not care about geography, place or time. Dementia will touch all at some point in their lives, whether it be grandparents, parents, friends, partners or acquaintances. It is often difficult to talk about or share.

Dementia is a real life problem that we wanted to try and solve, so we asked for advice from grandchildren in families living with dementia. Children and young people have amazing talent for problem solving; they are fearless and often blunt, but can approach problems that adults struggle with in surprising, empathetic and intuitive ways.

So when we asked young carers what to do about dementia in our local communities in England, they were amazingly incisive. One teenager Jack, whose great-uncle had dementia, said “we need a book, where the facts are true and the feelings are real… a bit like Diary of a Wimpy Kid, but about dementia… so my friends in school understand what I’m going through”. It was as simple as creating an accessible and shareable way to talk about dementia.

And this was how The Dementia Diaries was born. A story that started in a community center in Kent, UK, but has touched hearts worldwide. The Dementia Diaries is about more than dementia. It is about giving a voice to people who do not have a voice. Ultimately it is about love, relationships and what it means to be human.

“…It is also a book about the wisdom of children and young people…it is a book about the surprising depths of love between generations. Written by young people who have the courage to face the brutal facts of life. It is carefully leading you by the hand into new perceptions and discoveries of one of the diseases we all fear. I have a sister who is now in the final stage of Alzheimer’s, and the book has made me laugh and giggle with her over and over again…”, said Jens Peter Jensen (Social Innovation Platforms, Denmark)

The Dementia Diaries was as much about the process of bringing people together as the book itself. We found many people facing isolation, dealing with day-to-day challenges alone. “Sharing my story, I now feel more open about living with someone with dementia and it’s not a big hush hush. I feel it should be shared now, and not kept to yourself”, said Raisa, one of the younger contributors to the book.

We are equally proud of the accompanying Learning Resource that is available to download for everyone who purchases the book. Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world”. What better way to inspire a dementia friendly generation for the future? The Dementia Diaries helps people to learn from real life human experience with a bit of humor thrown in for good measure. “Life can sometimes be hard, but guess what you can still live well with dementia”, said Brian, one of the contributing grandparents.

In this book, people will find heart-warming stories about the good days, bad days and everything in between with dementia. Full of handy tips, facts and activities, The Dementia Diaries reveals the other side of dementia through the eyes of those who know it best. Join Fred, Sam, Brie and Sarah to read all about their escapades with their grandparents. “These are not just Diaries, they are a real beacon of hope for the future”, said Angela Rippon, OBE. Read testimonials from other people here.

Join The Dementia Diaries communities on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

From May 15 – 31, readers can win a copy of the award-winning Dementia Diaries! To enter, LIKE Dementia from Jessica Kingsley Publishers on Facebook or FOLLOW on Twitter. The winner will be selected on June 1, 2016!

Matthew Snyman is an award-winning writer and filmmaker based in London, born in South Africa, but grown in Kent, UK. He is focused on creating great stories for young people and for the young at heart. Follow Matthew on Twitter and visit his website

Emma Barrett Palmer is a social innovator and part of SILK’s founding team, the first lab of its kind in a UK government setting. She facilitated the co-creation of The Dementia Diairies and the book and learning resource. Emma is happiest with a pen and a blank sheet of paper. Follow Emma and SILK on Twitter.

Affected, not Infected – HIV/AIDS and the Elderly in Thailand

The HIV virus is known to affect men and women in their reproductive age, between 15-49 years, leaving behind a large dependent population – children, the elderly, etc. The elderly play an important role in the epidemic although they are the invisible victims of this epidemic. They may not necessarily be infected with HIV, but are certainly affected by it.

The various roles of the elderly in the HIV pandemic include care-giving to the infected children, co-residence with the infected, providing financial and material support, fostering grandchildren, experiencing the suffering and ultimate loss of a child, and facing negative community reactions. HIV can place a huge physical, emotional and financial burden on the elderly population of a country.

Thailand, in South East Asia, reported its first case of AIDS in 1984. The latest UNAIDS estimates (2013) suggest a 1.1% national adult HIV prevalence. Like many developing countries, Thailand maintains a relatively high involvement of older parents in the lives of the adult children. Seven out of ten elderly people over 60 years live with, live near, or receive some form of material support from their adult children. Corresponding figures show that over two-thirds of HIV+ adults lived with or near their parents. Additionally, a similar proportion of HIV+ adults reported to receiving parental care at the terminal stage of illness.

Caregiving to a HIV+ adult child places a significant burden on the elderly. They lose the material, financial and emotional support from children that they are counting on. In Thailand, a study reported that over 50% elderly HIV caregivers experience fatigue, insomnia and anxiety. However, this information is before the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Thailand. With the improved access to ART, HIV is increasingly looking like a chronic disease. The lifespan of HIV/AIDS patients is increasing, and those under ART can lead a ‘normal’ life. HIV/AIDS is no longer the death sentence it used to be.  Consequentially, the use of ART greatly reduces the responsibilities placed on the shoulders of the elderly population.

A big advantage of ART for the elderly is economic stability. Parents of HIV/AIDS children need no longer use their limited resources on the health of their children. Additionally, they can continue to rely on their adult children with HIV+ for financial support since ART can allow those children to lead a closer to ‘normal’ life. Parents’ psychological well-being has also improved due to fewer worries about the health of their children with HIV/AIDS. Thailand incorporated older people affected by HIV/AIDS as a target group in their 10th National AIDS Plan (2007-2011) for the first time. This not only demonstrates a sensitized understanding of the victims who are infected and affected of HIV/AIDS, but also marks a significant step forward in understanding and providing holistic care for the elderly population in Thailand.

Similar models of HIV care, with the elderly looking after the HIV/AIDS adult children, have been reported in countries including Cambodia and Tanzania. Even with the increasing use of ART, the elderly may play a role, albeit a modified one, in HIV care. There is a strong need for updated and comprehensive data to shed light on the issue to better inform current public health and HIV/AIDS campaigns.

Namratha Rao is currently pursuing her MSPH in International Health in Social and Behavioral Interventions at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.