Tag Archives: Volunteer

The Need for Improved Health and Social Reforms for Britain’s Aging Population

Photo Credit: Garry Knight

In today’s society, social and health care reforms for the elderly are more important than ever due to increasing aging populations worldwide. In Britain, these reforms have not greatly supported elderly care and need some major improvements. The current situation is shameful as more elderly should receive the care they need. Funding for health and social care services have been decreasing since 2005. In 2005-2006, a total of 1.231 million people aged 65 and older received some form of social care while in 2012-2013, a total of 896,000 received assistance. This shows a decrease of 335,000 elderly who did not receive the necessary care and services, although the overall number of elderly has been increasing in the last years. These services, such as Meals on Wheels or visits to daycare centers, had been terminated but are important to the elderly since it allowed them to live at home independently and have daily social interactions.

Oftentimes, the elderly do not have the support of their families and rely on these social services. As we get older, illnesses and disabilities can prevent us from getting out and becoming socially active. Life-changing events such as retirement and death of a family member or friend can also increase the risk of loneliness and isolation. In fact, 46% of people aged 80 and older reported that they often feel lonely. In addition, 10% of the population mentioned that television is their main form of company. This is sad and shocking at the same time. Are we all too busy to visit our parents or grandparents? “Each and every lonely person has someone who could visit them and offer companionship,” states states British Health Secretary Mr. Hunt to the Daily Express.

What can we do to involve the elderly in our lives and communities? Britain has started to recruit volunteers since they are important to nursing homes and older adults living at home. Volunteers provide much needed companionship and connections to communities. For example, Prime Minister David Cameron activated 30,000 teenagers to help people with dementia. In addition, these teens will teach the elderly modern technology so they can use Skype to talk with their families via internet.

Britain can also learn from health care or social systems in other European countries. A study showed that the elderly in Britain are poorer and lonelier than in similar European Countries. In addition, “they are more likely to suffer ageism in health care and in their daily lives than in either Germany, Sweden or the Netherlands.”

A role model for elderly care is the Asian culture that is well known for the respect and good treatment of the elderly. If an older person cannot live at home anymore, he or she will be taken in by family members. Nursing homes are usually the last option family members will consider as there is a strong social interaction and relationship among all generations. Britain as well as other countries can learn from this and strengthen the social relationships between generations.

Martina Lesperance is a Health Educator and Screening Technician in El Paso, Texas. 

 

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A Comparative View of Elder Abuse in Israel and the United States

Photo Credit: Hamed Masoumi

I spend every Tuesday morning visiting a dear friend at a local nursing home. My friend is a Holocaust survivor and at 90 years old, her mind is sharp since she easily recounts the story of her life – from the horrors of the camps to the beauty of Israel and finally to the hard work, freedom, and challenges of America. As I am ready to leave her and return to school each week, a look of loneliness washes over the smile on her face and I am reminded that her only other visitors are nurses and her daughter who can visit once a week.

The elderly comprise a significant amount of the U.S. population and statistics indicate that 10,000 baby boomers will turn 65 each day for the next 15 years. As the U.S. population ages, older adults are often viewed in a negative light, and hence a target group for all kinds of abuse: physical, sexual, verbal and financial exploitation. It is estimated that a shocking 500,000 older adults are abused each year in the United States, with family members as the overwhelming majority of abusers (mainly partners and children of the individual). Most of these cases go unreported because the victim does not have the physical capability or mental capacity to inform an official of the mistreatment.

Elder abuse is a major issue currently plaguing Israel as well. A report by the University of Haifa indicated that 18 percent of elderly participants were subject to some form of abuse. The most common form is verbal abuse, indicating a potential problem in interpersonal relationships as people age. Verbal abuse may also be used as a method to instill terror and power in a relationship, lending the way to more types of abuse.

Many religions teach people to respect and revere the elderly. In short, an individual’s exterior does not properly convey the depth of its contents. My dear friend appears to be a frail old woman with a failing body but her mind is very active. The elderly are people above all else and they deserve to be treated as such.

It is impossible to ignore the fact that everyone will grow old one day. With this in mind, I urge you to take some time and think about giving back by volunteering with a senior in your area. You may be the only contact the person has with the outside world beside the caregiver, and can advocate on their behalf if you suspect abuse. For U.S. residents, visit Give Back to Seniors to search for volunteer opportunities in your community.

Linda Nakagawa is a rising senior at Brandeis University. She is a double major in Psychology and Politics with a minor in Social Justice Social Policy. Linda is originally from Newburgh, New York and is a member of Temple Beth Jacob. As a Machon Kaplan participant, Linda was a public policy intern at the National Association of States United for Aging and Disability.