Tag Archives: Sleep

A Call to Reclaim Aging Today

Anti-aging! It’s everywhere.

There’s lotions, potions, creams, and make-up. Shampoo, moisturizers, face masks and toothpaste. There are anti-aging diets promoting superfoods, revitalizing drinks, vitamins, herbal mixes, homeopathic remedies and juicing whilst at the same time we read the latest story about the oldest person on the planet reaching that age on wine, chocolate, and a maverick attitude!

We’re told about anti-aging exercises, treatments, laser surgery, sun lamps, and cosmetic procedures. We’re advised on clothes, underwear, hairstyle, hair color, and even eyebrow shape!

There are books, magazines, DVDs, radio programmes, tv programmes, youtube channels, Facebook pages, Twitter accounts, Snaps, Insta influencers, podcasts, and blogs all dedicated to anti-aging.

We can even go on retreats, workshops, and seminars to learn, discuss and discover the best ways to beat aging.

Why?

Aging is a sign of survival- what’s the alternative? Not surviving? Not a great option. We need to celebrate having survived, realizing that the wrinkles, the lines, the grey hairs are a mark of success, of having reached a point in life that is your new record and you beat that record every day by getting older day by day. A ‘personal best’ you might say.

Whilst there appears to be a huge industry in ‘anti-aging’ and there is a myriad of ways that are promoted to be able to ‘stay young’, it cannot be denied that we are, all of us, not staying young! And that surely is the point.

We are all getting older and that is a good thing, we should stop trying to defy aging and, instead, live positively. Shake off the dreadful, negative, old age stereotypes and ask yourself what is so bad about aging that it has created such an ‘anti’ industry?

Let’s all be pro-age and let’s call out and challenge all the age discrimination that exists out there which has led to this huge ‘anti-aging’ phenomenon.

Let’s do it today.

Morna O’May is the Head of Service for Scotland at Contact the Elderly, the national charity dedicated to tackling loneliness and social isolation amongst older people living in the United Kingdom. Morna also writes the Goodstuffgreatideas blog about all things Third Sector. Follow Morna on Twitter.

How Quality Sleep Can Improve Skin Health During Post-Menopause

Photo Credit: 123rf
Photo Credit: 123rf

As the world gets busier day by day, many Americans fail to get enough quality sleep. In fact, lots of people are ready to sacrifice bedtime to catch up on daily tasks. The problem of insufficient sleep has become a huge concern and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now considers it an epidemic along with obesity. Approximately 50-70 million U.S. adults have sleep problems, according to the CDC. Gallup supports this data stating that 40 percent of U.S. adults sleep less than seven to nine hours as recommended by the National Sleep Foundation. Only 59 percent of U.S. adults meet that benchmark.

Lack of sleep is viewed as the cause of major disasters that have claimed and destroyed many lives. Less than the ideal sleep duration leads to difficulty concentrating, poor memory and other cognitive problems. These reduce productivity and result in accidents and man-made calamities. Lack of sleep also leads to a host of life-threatening diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity and cancer. According to a paper presented at ENDO 2015, the Endocrine Society Annual Meeting in San Diego, sleeping 30 minutes less than the ideal on weekdays can boost diabetes and obesity.

Effects To Skin

Insufficient sleep is a major factor that speeds up the body’s aging process. As such, it can lead to many skin-related problems like dull skin, premature wrinkles and bags under the eyes. Sleep experts say that deep sleep allows the body to do two essential processes to produce healthy and  glowing skin: cell repair and release of growth hormones. Decreased cell repair function can boost the body’s inflammatory response, causing more acne and increased skin sensitivity. In addition, more inflammatory cells in the body mean further breakdown of collagen and hyaluronic acid, the chemicals that give bounce, glow, and translucency to the skin.

Sleep deprivation disrupts hormone balance in the body. Therefore, sleeping less prompts the body to secrete more cortisol, the stress hormone. Excessive cortisol in the body can destroy skin collagen, the protein responsible for a smooth and elastic skin. Sleep loss also lessens human growth hormones that help thicken skin, increase body mass, and strengthen the bones. Moreover, lack of sleep leads to poor water balance, resulting in dull and dry skin. In addition, poor water balance in the body causes bags under the eyes and premature wrinkles.

Post-menopausal Sleep Problems

Adults, across all age groups, need eight hours of sleep on average. But elderly people are having a more difficult time falling asleep. Compared to their younger days, they have more trouble staying asleep. Approximately 50 percent of seniors have no problem sleeping. Seniors are light sleepers and their sleep efficiency – amount of time spent in bed as opposed to the number or hours spent in sleeping – falls at a rate of three percent per decade after they reach the age of 60. Lower sleep efficiency means shortened time in deep sleep.

For senior women, the effects of post-menopause contribute to sleep deprivation. The National Sleep Foundation states that postmenopausal women are less satisfied with their sleep and as many as 61 percent of them have symptoms of insomnia. Doctors cite hormone problems in women as the reason for lesser sleep satisfaction. Their fluctuating estrogen levels produce hot flashes and night sweats that disturb the sleep cycle. Drop in estrogen levels may also lead to sleep apnea, a condition that interferes with breathing during the night. Moreover, lowered progesterone levels in postmenopausal women are linked to insomnia.

During post-menopause, disruptions in women’s psychological condition results in sleep problems. The changes in their bodies before and during menopause may bring anxiety, depression, and stress that hinders the body to relax.

Tips for Better Sleep

To maintain a daily dose of sound sleep, do the following tips:

  • Engage in more physical activities. A daily exercise routine is a great way to induce deep sleep. Just make sure it is done less than an hour before going to bed.
  • Make relaxation methods a part of life. Stress and anxiety often make sleep difficult for most people, especially the elderly. Meditation, yoga, proper breathing, and other relaxation activities calm the muscles and nerves, and cues the body to release the sleep hormone melatonin.
  • Make the bed and bedroom a place only for sleep and sex. Almost a third of the day should be devoted to sleep. Thus, the bedroom should be comfortable and free from distractions. Make sure the bed and mattress are also comfortable for a restful sleep.
  • Get enough exposure to sunlight. Daylight exposure regulates the sleep-wake cycle or circadian rhythm. Sunlight cues the body to increase production of serotonin and melatonin. Serotonin is a molecule in the body that regulates sleep and melatonin keeps the body’s circadian rhythm in check. Be careful about getting too much sun exposure as it will trigger age spots. Using sunscreen can prevent current age spots from multiplying or enlarging in size.
  • Put daily activities in order as this can greatly reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Set a sleep schedule and stick to it even during weekends. Going to bed and waking up at a specific time every day will keep the circadian cycle in order.
  • Avoid eating a heavy meal, smoking as well as drinking alcohol and caffeine a few hours before bedtime. While these activities may satisfy the appetite, they can wreak havoc on the sleeping pattern.
  • Consult a doctor. Always discuss sleep problems with a doctor because there are some health conditions and medications that can disturb the sleeping pattern. A hormone imbalance during post-menopause also causes serious inconveniences including much-needed sleep. A doctor may prescribe hormone replacement therapy to restore the decreased estrogen and progesterone levels.

There is no alternative to daily quality sleep to improve health and beauty. A restful sleep not only retains health in postmenopausal life, but it also revitalizes skin to regain a healthy glow.

George Shanlikian MD is the medical director of Genemedics Health Institute. He is a national leader in the field of bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) and preventative medicine.

The Impact of Sleep Disorders Among the Elderly

Getting adequate sleep is a very common recommendation for achieving and maintaining good health. Insufficient sleep has been linked to a variety of chronic diseases (such as diabetes and heart disease) as well as unintentional injuries (such as motor vehicle accidents and workplace injuries). Poor sleep quality can also contribute to other issues that affect quality of life such as irritability, depressive symptoms, and inability to focus and stay on task.

Photo Credit: Pedro Ribeiro Simões
Photo Credit: Pedro Ribeiro Simões

The global adult population in general experiences a high prevalence of insufficient sleep, with some variation in terms of age, gender, and socioeconomic status. Among the elderly, however, the prevalence and subsequent effects can be especially pronounced. While it is not clear if this increase in prevalence of disrupted sleep and sleep disorders is due to aging itself or co-morbid conditions associated with aging (i.e, chronic pain, dementia), it is important to consider the impact such conditions have on the elderly.

It has been noted that common sleep disruptions among the elderly include trouble falling asleep, snoring, sleep apnea, insufficient time spent in deep sleep, rising early, and achieving fewer hours of sleep each night. The implications for sleep disruptions within this demographic can include a 2 to 3 times increased risk of stroke and mortality.

In considering the impact of sleep disorders among the elderly in the Americas, a study conducted in the Dominican Republic, Peru, Venezuela and Mexico found that 23-31% of older adults aged 65 to 80+ years experienced sleep disruptions. The prevalence appeared higher among women than men. In comparison to previous studies, it was found that among individuals aged 40 and older in Uruguay, Chile, and Venezuela, 34.7% reported trouble falling asleep. Previous findings have also included reports that 25% of individuals aged 18-77 years old in Buenos Aires, Sao Paulo, and Mexico City reported being moderately or severely impacted by sleep problems, with severity increasing with age.

To address sleep disruption among the elderly, it is important that health care providers, community support systems, and social support systems work with the aged to ensure they are experiencing the best quality of life possible. This includes working with the elderly to achieve optimal sleep.

Diana Kingsbury is a PhD student and graduate assistant in prevention science at the Kent State University College of Public Health.