Tag Archives: Parkinson’s

12 Ways to Reach Out to Caregivers During National Caregivers Appreciation Month

Photo Credit: Marianne Scuccio
Photo Credit: Marianne Sciucco

Chances are you know someone caring for a loved one who is sick or has a disability. This could be due to an illness such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, cancer, stroke, or a variety of other conditions. Some family members provide live-in care, others visit daily or weekly, and some oversee care from a distance, or care provided by hired aides or a nursing facility.

No matter how the caregiver performs his or her role, caregiving is a tough job, requiring resources that are often scarce: time, money, support, and assistance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that more than 34 million unpaid caregivers provide care to someone age 18 and older who is ill or has a disability, and an estimated 21 percent of households in the USA are impacted by caregiving responsibilities.

Almost all of this work is unpaid, typically provided by family members and often performed around the clock with no breaks. Also, many caregivers juggle other responsibilities such as jobs, raising children, and managing their own households.

November is National Caregivers Appreciation Month, and a great time to reach out to those providing care and help lighten their load. In recognition of those who work tirelessly and selflessly to care for a loved one, below are 12 ways to offer assistance and let caregivers know that you care. These people need support and often that support does not cost much, if anything, and takes little time.

  1. Ask if you can sit for them a little while so they can run errands, take a break, see the doctor, or attend church or a caregiver’s support group, whatever they need to do to take care of themselves.
  2. Going to the grocery store? Call and ask if there is anything you can pick up for them.
  3. If your employer allows, donate paid sick time, vacation days, or personal time to a coworker caring for a relative who is hospitalized or needs post-hospital care.
  4. Volunteer to mow the lawn, weed the garden, rake the leaves, or shovel the snow.
  5. Share the bounty, whether from your vegetable or your flower garden. Fresh produce and fresh flowers are cheerful.
  6. If you have the skills and tools, offer to change the oil in their car and rotate the tires.
  7. Again, if you have the skills and tools, offer a free haircut to the caregiver and/or their loved one.
  8. Walk their dog.
  9. Ask if they would like you to wash and clean out their car.
  10. Volunteer to take out the trash and bring the barrels out to the curb on trash day.
  11. Double cook a meal, preferably one of their favorites, and send over a dinner.
  12. Include them in your prayers.

For more information about caregiving and caregivers, please follow #AlzAuthors on Twitter during National Caregivers Appreciation Month in November 2015, or find AlzAuthors on Facebook.

Marianne Sciucco is not a nurse who writes but a writer who happens to be a nurse. A lover of words and books, she dreamed of becoming an author when she grew up, but became a nurse to avoid poverty. She later brought her two passions together and writes about the intricate lives of people struggling with health and family issues. Her debut novel, Blue Hydrangeas, an Alzheimer’s love story, is a Kindle bestseller, BookWorks featured book, IndieReader Approved, and winner of IndieReCon’s 2014 Best Indie Novel Award. A native Bostonian, Marianne lives in New York’s Hudson Valley and when not writing, works as a campus nurse at a community college. She can be reached via her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

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Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s: A Great Threat to the U.S. National Budget

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Since the last Presidential Election, the national budget has been a sore spot for Republicans and Democrats, the two major political parties in the U.S. While government programs such as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are leading debates on reducing the national budget, politicians are oblivious of a looming threat to the budget. People with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases require constant and very expensive care. Also, these debilitating illnesses can prevent affected persons from working, which may have a devastating long-term impact on the budget.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. and an estimated 5.4 million Americans currently suffer from AD. If current population trends continue, the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease will increase significantly unless the disease can be effectively treated or prevented. The U.S. population is aging and the risk of Alzheimer’s increases with age. For instance, Alzheimer’s usually begins after age 60 and the number of people with the disease doubles for every five-year interval beyond age 65. About five percent of men and women ages 65 to 74 have Alzheimer’s disease and it is estimated that nearly half of those age 85 and older may have the disease. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease and affects one million people in the United States. Symptoms of PD include muscle rigidity, tremors, and changes in speech and gait that worsen as the illness progresses over time. PD is more common in the elderly and most often develops after age 50. Sometimes, Parkinson’s disease occurs in younger adults. When a young person is affected with PD, it is usually because of a form of the disease that runs in families.

With strong research investment, heart disease deaths in the U.S. fell by 13 percent in the past decade. Alzheimer’s deaths rose by 68 percent from 2000 to 2010 and continue to increase. The issue is not how, but why we cannot increase our investment in research into fighting these diseases that have a tremendous impact on both the individual and society. Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s get comparatively less funding than other top diseases because they are more common in the elderly and largely ignored. Stigma is another reason why it is hard to raise money since people with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s rarely talk about the disease. Also, Alzheimer’s is different from other diseases because Alzheimer’s patients rarely lead marches to fight for more funding since their memory is impacted. It is important to our nation’s economic future to reduce the deficit, but we cannot ignore the importance of investing in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s research. As the nation’s older populations grow, the cost of care for these diseases will rise dramatically. In fact, Alzheimer’s is expected to cost the U.S. more than $1 trillion annually and persons who leave the workforce to care for an affected family member impact economic productivity. Increasing funding for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s will require difficult choices and shared sacrifice in spending reductions and increased revenues.

AlzheimersAssociation
As the U.S. Congress continues to agree or disagree on the best way to fix Medicare, a government health program, the national budget will likely increase if there is no dramatic increased investment in research into fighting Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The devastating statistics continue to increase and rising health care costs pose a great problem to the U.S. economy.

Sophie Okolo is the Founder of Global Health Aging.