Social and Financial Costs of Millennial Dementia Caregivers

A report by the Center for Healthcare Innovation. Abstract With the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease expected to impact 16 million individuals by 2050, younger generations will increasingly assume caregiving responsibilities. More than a third of today’s caregivers are employed full-time. As millennials take on informal caregiving responsibilities, public and workplace policies must consider financial assistance or other support (e.g., family leave or allocated time off). … Continue reading Social and Financial Costs of Millennial Dementia Caregivers

12 Ways to Reach Out to Caregivers During National Caregivers Appreciation Month

Chances are you know someone caring for a loved one who is sick or has a disability. This could be due to an illness such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, cancer, stroke, or a variety of other conditions. Some family members provide live-in care, others visit daily or weekly, and some oversee care from a distance, or care provided by hired aides or a nursing facility. No … Continue reading 12 Ways to Reach Out to Caregivers During National Caregivers Appreciation Month

Family Caregivers: The Unsung Heroes of Society

In 2004, my father was diagnosed with Parkinson’s-related dementia and a few months later, my mother with Alzheimer’s disease. That was the year I became a caregiver. While my parents did not reside with me, I was still intimately involved in their daily care for the next 4 and 5 years. Traveling down that rabbit hole of dementia with my parents was difficult and sad. … Continue reading Family Caregivers: The Unsung Heroes of Society

The Science of Alzheimer’s: Where Are We Going?

The McMaster Health Forum, with support from the Labarge Optimal Aging Initiative, recently hosted a public talk to examine the latest research and evidence into risks, prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. This talk featured presentations by Jay Ingram, one of Canada’s best-known and most popular science personalities, and Dr. Christopher Patterson, an expert on the diagnosis and treatment of dementia. “My experience is that when … Continue reading The Science of Alzheimer’s: Where Are We Going?

Is Gogo the New Mama? How HIV/AIDS and globalization are increasing the role of older caregivers

Precious, a woman who looks well beyond her sixty-six years of age, sits in her yard in rural Zimbabwe watching over her three grandchildren, ages four, six and seven. “Gogo, gogo!” the youngest one beckons his grandmother, as he chases after his older siblings who are in search of guava fruits. Precious’ son, Michael, left for South Africa for work shortly after he married Mary, … Continue reading Is Gogo the New Mama? How HIV/AIDS and globalization are increasing the role of older caregivers

Expectations and Reality: A Review of Long-Term Care

Unfortunately, it is impossible to create a standardized time frame regarding end-of-life or long-term care since it varies case by case. While there are signs and symptoms that allow people to predict the direction that someone’s health is going, many individuals begin long term care after a sudden life change that leaves them unable to care for themselves at home. One day, they could be … Continue reading Expectations and Reality: A Review of Long-Term Care