Tag Archives: Baby Boomers

Aquatic Therapy Facilities: Focusing on Water Quality, Air Temperature and Noise

In October of 2015, Global Health Aging celebrated National Physical Therapy Month by publishing a weekly four-part series on aquatic therapy. Part 3 of the series touched on three major considerations when looking for aquatic facilities. Herein, the blog continues to examine other factors that may contribute to new participants’ decisions in selecting a facility, especially when there is more than one facility in close proximity to the patron. In December, be sure to look for suggestions on equipment for new patrons’ holiday wish list.

Photo Credit: Penn State
Photo Credit: Penn State

Air Temperature

It is very important for patrons to be comfortable and warm when exercising in the water. If a patron tends to get cold, he or she can purchase a partial wetsuit or wet vest. A less expensive option is to simply wear a snug-fitting long sleeve shirt (over the top of a swimsuit, if female). When air temperatures are significantly cooler than the water temperature, a swim cap or even a knit ski type cap can greatly reduce the amount of heat lost through the head. This will help insure that the participant remains comfortably warm in the pool.

Noise Level and Water Quality

These two considerations are rare options that patrons can control when selecting a facility, unless they are willing to pay or drive to destinations farther than what is locally available. Most often, if using a public facility like a YMCA or athletic club, there is little choice available to the participant. However, it is worth noting, just to be certain, that these conditions will not impede or hamper participation.

Regarding noise level, natatoriums tend to have a lot of extraneous noise. If multiple groups are working simultaneously in either different areas of the same pool or within the same room, noise interference between the groups may diminish a participant’s satisfaction and focus. In classes designed for senior citizens who generally may have more trouble hearing than children, classes for children, like swim lessons, should not be scheduled at the same time as classes for seniors. Children naturally want to scream, especially when splashed. Hence, it is fun for them and a good release of their anxieties, as they are not yet comfortable in the water. It is not fair to expect children to be quiet, nor is it fair to expect seniors to enjoy their classes when they cannot hear the instructor and focus on the work to be done.

When selecting a facility, water quality is another consideration that may be of concern Most pools today still use either a chlorine or bromine system to kill off harmful contaminants like bacteria. While salt pools and ion filters are more prevalent in smaller pools, they may also pose challenges to patrons with skin sensitivities. Water quality is not controlled by patrons in public facilities, therefore participants are better able to tolerate the harshness of the chemicals used in pools, by showering, prior to entering the pool. Most patrons consider showering an important responsibility to rid the body of oils, lotions, deodorants and perfumes that may add to the cloudiness of water. But few do not understand that they are doing themselves a disservice by not rinsing off before entering the pool. When a patron is already soaking wet, including their swimsuit and hair, he or she has saturated the oils etc., reducing the potential for chemicals to adhere to their skin, hair and swimsuit. By showering before entering the pool, a patron protects him or herself as well as the quality of the pool water.

Sound Systems

Sound systems deserve some brief mention as they can often be helpful when overcoming noise interference or hearing deficits. Sound systems are also good for playing music which not only adds to the enjoyment of many class programs, but the music sets the tempo and cadence for movement. There are some sound systems that play music over speakers outside the pool and the instructor may be either on the pool deck, leading the class or in the water. An instructor may wear a microphone headset that transmits a wireless voice signal to be broadcast through the speakers, if the sound system is waterproof. The choice of music can also induce relaxation in some cases.

If a patron of aquatic therapy returns to the pool to practice or perform assigned exercises without an instructor present, waterproof personal systems can add enjoyment and motivation to a patron’s aquatic therapy session. One of the most ingenious products on the market today is called a SwiMP3. The aquatic patron downloads a song list to a waterproof MP3 player and listens to the music through headphones that are actually placed adjacent to the ears on the jawbone, and the sound is perceived through bone conduction. Amazing!

Since touring an aquatic facility is exhaustive, it may be worth choosing to contract for a “trial” membership. If the patron chooses to no longer participate, the expense of a long-term membership commitment is not lost. Aquatic therapy and exercise are not only good for physical well-being, the socialization and relationships that are created in the water tend to last for years. As with most things in life, change is difficult. Choosing to begin an aquatic program is a huge investment of time and energy. Establishing a regular routine can be challenging, but when that commitment becomes routine, the benefits become SO evident that few will stop coming. Aquatics are good for life!

Felecia Fischell is an aquatic specialist with 25 years experience in aquatics. She leads aquatic classes and consults as an aquatic personal trainer and a swim instructor in and around Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia, USA. The Founder of FunLife Aquatics Consulting and Personal Training, Felecia presents at health fairs and has given aquatic presentations to high schools, Howard County Board of Education, Howard County General Hospital and Howard Community College.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Africa Must Prepare for Aging Population Now

Photo Credit: United Nations Photo

As countries like Japan and Italy prepare for the challenges of an aging population, African countries are focusing on the need for youth empowerment. Youth make up the next generation of workers, parents, and leaders in Africa; hence investing in them is top priority for the continent’s transformation. While empowering youth is important, African nations cannot ignore the outcome of greatly increased birth rates.

Since Africa is the most youthful continent in the world – two-thirds of the continent’s 1.1 billion people are younger than 35 – what will happen when the youth become elderly citizens? And what will happen to elderly citizens if the continent does not plan for increased birth rates now? The rise in the number of elderly citizens may take a strain on families and the incidence of aging-associated diseases like cancer will hit an all time high.

This situation is especially complex because agencies like the World Health Organization and United Nations Population Fund support the use of contraceptives to space out births’ for maternal and child health. The use of contraceptives is a controversial issue in Africa as opponents may argue that contraceptives will prevent women from having children. Proponents for contraceptives may find the concept ludicrous although in countries like Germany, where the use of contraceptives is widely accepted, women have fewer children or no children. Having children or not is one’s personal choice; the concern is the result of choices that a nation made.

West African nations are among the continents most fertile – the average woman in Niger has nearly seven children in her lifetime. With the current youth population, increased birth rates and use of contraceptives, African nations are facing an unforeseen future. Currently, aging Africans are facing new problems including the changing practice of extended families taking care of elderly members. Children are now migrating to other nations for better opportunities, leaving their parents to care for themselves. If African governments do not address current problems as well as prepare for the increased birth rates, it is likely that the future will bring many challenges to the aging population and continent as a whole.

African countries that currently have large youth populations are poised to experience a potential demographic boost to their economies. While such countries will see this population age into the workforce, they will also experience rising proportions of seniors with this group. It is critical for governments to plan now for the future with smart government policies. Training citizens to embrace the aging process and raising awareness of the challenges associated with this stage of life is important. Companies should also be encouraged to work with the elderly so as to improve their health, lifestyle and wellness.

Equipping older adults with coping skills, and encouraging people of all ages – especially the youth – to not smoke, do more physical activity, and practice moderate alcohol consumption and good nutrition will pay good health dividends later in life.

Sophie Okolo is the Founder of Global Health Aging.

An Invisible Epidemic: Substance Abuse Among Baby Boomers in Europe

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Substance abuse among the elderly is a real problem. In Europe, it was reported that the number of people over the age of 65 with a problem of drug abuse will double between 2001 and 2020. These substances include legal medication, tobacco, alcohol, illegal drugs, prescription drugs, as well as over-the counter medicine. One of the reasons why there is an increase of substance abuse among today’s elderly, also called Baby Boomers, is because they have a more tolerant attitude towards drugs, which in the 1960’s, were acceptable for recreational use. Other reasons are mostly related to emotional and psychosocial issues that result from dealing with difficult life changes or situations. These life situations may be caused by a death of a friend or family member, retirement, loneliness, depression, and even homelessness. The elderly use drugs to compensate for the loneliness and social isolation they may experience. However, being intoxicated definitely hinders them to take part in social events and gatherings, which could improve their mental state. It seems to be a cycle that a drug user may not get out of without help.

Most reports and research about substance abuse are focused on the younger generation although with an increase of aging population worldwide, drug abuse among the elderly has become more of a problem and is often referred to as a hidden or “invisible epidemic”. Why is this a public health issue we need to fix? Drug abuse not only affects the mental state of a person but can also lead to physical harm. Alcohol and illegal drug abuse are among the top ten risk factors for premature death and health problems. It is also reported that the mortality rate of older drug users is significantly higher compared to young drug users.

After a long-term drug abuse, one may experience memory loss, social isolation, weight loss, and pain. Older people who are drug users are intoxicated and more likely to suffer falls and serious injuries. Especially after a fall, their mental and physical health will decline rapidly. In most cases, substance abuse of older adults who live at home alone will go undetected because they are able to hide it from their family as well as their physician. Physicians are often not able to differentiate between the symptoms of substance use and symptoms of aging. This is why the elderly rarely get referred to a Substance Abuse Specialist so they can receive the help they need. It is important to raise awareness of substance abuse among the older generation. We need to educate physicians, nurses, as well as our family members on how to recognize symptoms or behaviors of substance abuse. In addition, treatments and interventions have to be tailored to the needs of older drug users.

Martina Lesperance is a Health Educator and Screening Technician in El Paso, Texas.