Why More Millennials Are Becoming Caregivers

Millennials often get stereotyped as lazy, entitled, and self-involved, but did you know that about one out of six millennials in the United States is a caregiver for someone with dementia, and with an average age of 27 years? Nor is it a problem limited to Americans. One in four young Canadians provides care to a family member or friend.

In 2019, Global Health Aging was proud to author a report with the Center for Healthcare Innovation titled Social and Financial Costs of Millennial Dementia Caregivers. The report evaluates the social and economic implications of the shifting U.S. demographics on dementia and caregiving in vulnerable, at-risk populations.

There is a lack of research about the experiences of young people living with a parent or grandparent with dementia. As the number of people with dementia is expected to increase to 82 million in 2030 and 152 million in 2050, the hope is that more case studies and published research become available. One groundbreaking resource is ‘The Dementia Diaries’ by Matthew Snyman, an award-winning filmmaker based in London, and Emma Barrett Palmer, the founder of HumanKINDER located in Chamonix, France.

A novel in cartoons, this award-winning project looks at dementia from the perspective of a young person by following four real-life young people dealing with dementia in their grandparents. In 2016, Global Health Aging organized a giveaway featuring The Dementia Diaries for Dementia Awareness Week.

Alzheimer’s and dementia are still a largely hidden problem in many countries. Even when awareness is present, confusion and memory loss are considered an inevitable part of aging, rather than signs of a degenerative disease. One of the goals of Global Health Aging is to change that perception through education and media.

Are you a caregiver for someone with dementia? If no, do you know another caregiver or anyone with dementia?

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