12 Ways to Reach Out to Caregivers During National Caregivers Appreciation Month

Photo Credit: Marianne Scuccio
Photo Credit: Marianne Sciucco

Chances are you know someone caring for a loved one who is sick or has a disability. This could be due to an illness such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, cancer, stroke, or a variety of other conditions. Some family members provide live-in care, others visit daily or weekly, and some oversee care from a distance, or care provided by hired aides or a nursing facility.

No matter how the caregiver performs his or her role, caregiving is a tough job, requiring resources that are often scarce: time, money, support, and assistance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that more than 34 million unpaid caregivers provide care to someone age 18 and older who is ill or has a disability, and an estimated 21 percent of households in the USA are impacted by caregiving responsibilities.

Almost all of this work is unpaid, typically provided by family members and often performed around the clock with no breaks. Also, many caregivers juggle other responsibilities such as jobs, raising children, and managing their own households.

November is National Caregivers Appreciation Month, and a great time to reach out to those providing care and help lighten their load. In recognition of those who work tirelessly and selflessly to care for a loved one, below are 12 ways to offer assistance and let caregivers know that you care. These people need support and often that support does not cost much, if anything, and takes little time.

  1. Ask if you can sit for them a little while so they can run errands, take a break, see the doctor, or attend church or a caregiver’s support group, whatever they need to do to take care of themselves.
  2. Going to the grocery store? Call and ask if there is anything you can pick up for them.
  3. If your employer allows, donate paid sick time, vacation days, or personal time to a coworker caring for a relative who is hospitalized or needs post-hospital care.
  4. Volunteer to mow the lawn, weed the garden, rake the leaves, or shovel the snow.
  5. Share the bounty, whether from your vegetable or your flower garden. Fresh produce and fresh flowers are cheerful.
  6. If you have the skills and tools, offer to change the oil in their car and rotate the tires.
  7. Again, if you have the skills and tools, offer a free haircut to the caregiver and/or their loved one.
  8. Walk their dog.
  9. Ask if they would like you to wash and clean out their car.
  10. Volunteer to take out the trash and bring the barrels out to the curb on trash day.
  11. Double cook a meal, preferably one of their favorites, and send over a dinner.
  12. Include them in your prayers.

For more information about caregiving and caregivers, please follow #AlzAuthors on Twitter during National Caregivers Appreciation Month in November 2015, or find AlzAuthors on Facebook.

Marianne Sciucco is not a nurse who writes but a writer who happens to be a nurse. A lover of words and books, she dreamed of becoming an author when she grew up, but became a nurse to avoid poverty. She later brought her two passions together and writes about the intricate lives of people struggling with health and family issues. Her debut novel, Blue Hydrangeas, an Alzheimer’s love story, is a Kindle bestseller, BookWorks featured book, IndieReader Approved, and winner of IndieReCon’s 2014 Best Indie Novel Award. A native Bostonian, Marianne lives in New York’s Hudson Valley and when not writing, works as a campus nurse at a community college. She can be reached via her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

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The African Age Wave – The Future is Now

Photo Credit: Pixabay
Photo Credit: Pixabay

“As we get older, our rights do not change. As we get older, we are no less human and should not become invisible.” These powerful words by 84-year-old South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu illustrate the necessary social, economic, and political shift that needs to occur in order for global sustainability to be achieved. He is in fact a living testament of what the world can expect to see, as the age wave extends itself far beyond geographical borders. In the foreword of the 2015 Global AgeWatch Index, Tutu goes on to say that “No future development goals can be legitimate or sustainable unless they include people of all ages and leave no one behind.” According to the National Institute on Health, “In 2010, an estimated 524 million people were aged 65 or older – eight percent of the world’s population. By 2050, this number is expected to nearly triple to about 1.5 billion, representing 16 percent of the world’s population.” This phenomenon is unprecedented, pervasive, enduring, and has profound implications around the world, especially in Africa where the age wave has gone virtually unnoticed.

The Global AgeWatch Index provides insight on the state of older people in various regions around the world. The Index measures four key domains that affect the welfare of older adults which include, income security, health status, capability and the enabling environment. According to the report, “Despite Africa’s rapid economic growth, poor social and economic wellbeing for older people means most countries continue to rank in the bottom quarter of the Index.” Mauritius ranked 42nd, which was the highest ranking of the region. This was followed by South Africa which ranked 78th, Ghana 81st, Tanzania 91st, Mozambique 94th and Malawi 95th. Although the index sheds light on the disparities that older adults are faced with, it does not tell the entire story for the African continent. Due to lack of data, only 11 of the 54 countries were evaluated.

While this report offers an empirical snapshot of the challenges faced by older adults in Africa, 65-year-old Dominic Ologi of Nairobi, Kenya personifies the plight of income security, one of the four key domains. His story parallels others throughout Africa. Ologi spent 30 years working in both private and public sectors, and when he retired nearly 10 years ago, he was faced with a harsh realization – he could not afford to remain without employment. His circumstance required that he goes back to work, and now at 65, Ologi is running a tap water kiosk. He is unable to enjoy his golden years just yet. Analogous to many Kenyans, Ologi is without savings and receives 7,500 shillings ($75) a month from his state pension. According to the South African financial services firm, Alexander Forbes, more than 40 percent of Kenyans cannot afford to retire and must continue working, and another 40 percent rely on family for support. Ologi’s story is not the exception, but in fact the rule. Based on this data, eight out of 10 Kenyans will experience similar hardships.

Conclusions about the Index can be drawn from what it states as well as from what it is missing. On the one hand, Africa is on its way to ratifying a charter on human rights that will outline specific obligations to older people. This effort signifies a more serious commitment to the urgent need for improvement that Africa now seeks to address. On the other hand, I could not help but think about the unquantifiable elements that would show Africa and the treatment of its elders in a more positive light. From firsthand experience, I have witnessed the level of respect given to elders in Africa remains unmatched. Elders continue to be the nucleus of entire communities, and are often sought after for wisdom and guidance. The African proverb, “A village without the elderly is like a well without water” illustrates the value placed on their contributions. Although Africa has a long journey towards developing an infrastructure that supports the needs of its older people, in some ways, it is miles ahead of the rest.

Andria Reta is a Gerontologist and Health Administration Professor.

 

Aquatic Therapy Facilities: Focusing on Water Quality, Air Temperature and Noise

In October of 2015, Global Health Aging celebrated National Physical Therapy Month by publishing a weekly four-part series on aquatic therapy. Part 3 of the series touched on three major considerations when looking for aquatic facilities. Herein, the blog continues to examine other factors that may contribute to new participants’ decisions in selecting a facility, especially when there is more than one facility in close proximity to the patron. In December, be sure to look for suggestions on equipment for new patrons’ holiday wish list.

Photo Credit: Penn State
Photo Credit: Penn State

Air Temperature

It is very important for patrons to be comfortable and warm when exercising in the water. If a patron tends to get cold, he or she can purchase a partial wetsuit or wet vest. A less expensive option is to simply wear a snug-fitting long sleeve shirt (over the top of a swimsuit, if female). When air temperatures are significantly cooler than the water temperature, a swim cap or even a knit ski type cap can greatly reduce the amount of heat lost through the head. This will help insure that the participant remains comfortably warm in the pool.

Noise Level and Water Quality

These two considerations are rare options that patrons can control when selecting a facility, unless they are willing to pay or drive to destinations farther than what is locally available. Most often, if using a public facility like a YMCA or athletic club, there is little choice available to the participant. However, it is worth noting, just to be certain, that these conditions will not impede or hamper participation.

Regarding noise level, natatoriums tend to have a lot of extraneous noise. If multiple groups are working simultaneously in either different areas of the same pool or within the same room, noise interference between the groups may diminish a participant’s satisfaction and focus. In classes designed for senior citizens who generally may have more trouble hearing than children, classes for children, like swim lessons, should not be scheduled at the same time as classes for seniors. Children naturally want to scream, especially when splashed. Hence, it is fun for them and a good release of their anxieties, as they are not yet comfortable in the water. It is not fair to expect children to be quiet, nor is it fair to expect seniors to enjoy their classes when they cannot hear the instructor and focus on the work to be done.

When selecting a facility, water quality is another consideration that may be of concern Most pools today still use either a chlorine or bromine system to kill off harmful contaminants like bacteria. While salt pools and ion filters are more prevalent in smaller pools, they may also pose challenges to patrons with skin sensitivities. Water quality is not controlled by patrons in public facilities, therefore participants are better able to tolerate the harshness of the chemicals used in pools, by showering, prior to entering the pool. Most patrons consider showering an important responsibility to rid the body of oils, lotions, deodorants and perfumes that may add to the cloudiness of water. But few do not understand that they are doing themselves a disservice by not rinsing off before entering the pool. When a patron is already soaking wet, including their swimsuit and hair, he or she has saturated the oils etc., reducing the potential for chemicals to adhere to their skin, hair and swimsuit. By showering before entering the pool, a patron protects him or herself as well as the quality of the pool water.

Sound Systems

Sound systems deserve some brief mention as they can often be helpful when overcoming noise interference or hearing deficits. Sound systems are also good for playing music which not only adds to the enjoyment of many class programs, but the music sets the tempo and cadence for movement. There are some sound systems that play music over speakers outside the pool and the instructor may be either on the pool deck, leading the class or in the water. An instructor may wear a microphone headset that transmits a wireless voice signal to be broadcast through the speakers, if the sound system is waterproof. The choice of music can also induce relaxation in some cases.

If a patron of aquatic therapy returns to the pool to practice or perform assigned exercises without an instructor present, waterproof personal systems can add enjoyment and motivation to a patron’s aquatic therapy session. One of the most ingenious products on the market today is called a SwiMP3. The aquatic patron downloads a song list to a waterproof MP3 player and listens to the music through headphones that are actually placed adjacent to the ears on the jawbone, and the sound is perceived through bone conduction. Amazing!

Since touring an aquatic facility is exhaustive, it may be worth choosing to contract for a “trial” membership. If the patron chooses to no longer participate, the expense of a long-term membership commitment is not lost. Aquatic therapy and exercise are not only good for physical well-being, the socialization and relationships that are created in the water tend to last for years. As with most things in life, change is difficult. Choosing to begin an aquatic program is a huge investment of time and energy. Establishing a regular routine can be challenging, but when that commitment becomes routine, the benefits become SO evident that few will stop coming. Aquatics are good for life!

Felecia Fischell is an aquatic specialist with 25 years experience in aquatics. She leads aquatic classes and consults as an aquatic personal trainer and a swim instructor in and around Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia, USA. The Founder of FunLife Aquatics Consulting and Personal Training, Felecia presents at health fairs and has given aquatic presentations to high schools, Howard County Board of Education, Howard County General Hospital and Howard Community College.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping Brains Healthy Across the Lifespan: Is It Really As Easy As Counting to 5?

Photo Credit: Allan Bergman
Photo Credit: Allan Bergman

Research over the last 20 years on the impact of lifestyle on brain health indicates that how people live each day can strongly influence the delay and potential prevention of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. To appreciate the full weight of these findings, the World Alzheimer’s Report 2014 estimates that if dementia is delayed for just five years, incidence would be cut by half! By 2030, this delay translates to nearly 44 million people who will not succumb to dementia, and estimated financial savings for individuals, their families and global health systems is projected to exceed $600 billion.

Risk for age-related brain disease, the number one fear of people over 50 in the USA, begins decades before symptoms appear. The appeal of embracing a protective lifestyle is a welcomed alternative and becomes increasingly important from middle age onward. While the brain’s plasticity across the lifespan means that it is never too late to benefit from healthy lifestyle choices, the rule of ‘use it or lose it’  implies that loss of unused neural networks, skills and healthy habits are harder to recapture the older people get.

Figuring out how to live each day may not be so simple. Though multiple studies show a difference in types of daily activities for people who did not develop dementia versus those that did, pinpointing WHAT activities is complex. Researcher Jaak Panksepp’s work sheds light on wired at birth brain networks that need to stay active across the entire lifespan to effectively promote survival and longevity for mammals. These include seeking, play, care and restoration. Scientific news reports also tout the importance of sleep, exercise, diet, leisure activities, antioxidants and other factors supporting brain health. In general, beneficial lifestyle activities create awareness and reflection, involve physical activity, promote heightened engagement and connection to people, pique interest, and more.

Frequency counts! The above-referenced research suggests that those who did not develop dementia engaged in at least five beneficial activities per day, five days a week. Given that average cognitive decline for people over 60 is 1-2 percent per year, frequency appears to be very important to avoid this slippery slope. Actual improvement in cognitive function will also likely require MORE than these activity levels. For most, this runs counter to conventional thinking about aging, which tells people to slow down or retire as they age.

Brains are better off if individuals participate in beneficial activities such as good sleep, exercise, learning and play; and people engage in interesting, fun hobbies five times a day, five days a week. Due to the slippery slope of decline per year, people need to maintain a healthy lifestyle throughout their lives by staying active. The goal is not to overwork the body to keep brains healthy, so below are two mechanisms that promote wholesome lifestyles and offer protection if people take time out because of illness, injury, or vacation.

1. The longer people engage in beneficial activities, the more cognitive reserves they build, which protect against cognitive decline. Education and physical exercise are the primary ‘reserve’ builders. Education across the lifespan is the best way to maintain and improve brain functioning, and the more physical exercise people do over many years, the greater resiliency their bodies have to fight unhealthy aging. Reserves will kick in for protection if injury, illness or an abundance of stress occurs. Even those with ailments can partake in tailored activities that ensure the highest possible quality of life.

2. It is possible to multiply the benefit of each activity by adding ‘boosters’. There are a number of ways to do this, but for simplicity’s sake, counting to five is ideal:

  • Add social engagement to any activity throughout each day.
  • Weave a physical element into whatever you are doing – work up a sweat as you vacuum, go for a walk while on the phone, take action breaks when sitting for extended periods.
  • Choose activities that are meaningful to you – be with people you care about, do things you consider important and have always wanted to do.
  • Love what you do! Choose activities that make you and others laugh, that make you feel great, and that bring out the best in you.
  • Try new things, meet new people, stretch your mind and body in ways you have not done before.

By counting to five – five activities a day, five days a week, five boosters that add up to five more years of brain health – one can reap a potential lifetime of health benefits for both the brain and body.

Joan Parsons, MBA and MS Certificate in Interpersonal Neurobiology, is founder and CEO of Lifestyle Rewired. The company offers lifestyle assessments, High Value Activity Programs and Immersion Travel Programs that enrich and protect brain health. Joan’s mother Sally developed dementia in her 70’s, becoming the inspiration to identify how such a vital woman could succumb to brain disease at a relatively young age. Researching hundreds of studies on the impact of lifestyle on the brain enabled the team to develop concepts and models to support life long brain health, hence Lifestyle Rewired was born. The company’s programs and tools focus on activities that inspire learning, new experiences, and meaningful human connection. 

Family Caregivers: The Unsung Heroes of Society

Photo Credit: Vicki Tapia
Photo Credit: Vicki Tapia

In 2004, my father was diagnosed with Parkinson’s-related dementia and a few months later, my mother with Alzheimer’s disease. That was the year I became a caregiver. While my parents did not reside with me, I was still intimately involved in their daily care for the next 4 and 5 years. Traveling down that rabbit hole of dementia with my parents was difficult and sad. I watched helplessly as this disease steadily and ruthlessly chipped away at their brains, one memory at a time. That said, it was also a time of considerable personal growth for me. I learned to parent my parents with patience and compassion, caring for them much as they had cared for me as a child so many years before. Interspersed with the challenges were times of fleeting lucidity as well as moments of poignant tenderness, which I still remember and cherish, even today. These are moments I would have missed forever, had I not been a family caregiver.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association’s 2015 Facts and Figures, 85 percent of unpaid caregiving help for older adults in the USA is provided by family members. Women make up two thirds of that number, and over half of women caring for people with dementia are taking care of parents.

How many people actually plan on being an unpaid caregiver? Whether it is a spouse, parent or well-loved aunt, it is unlikely that most of us will ever anticipate the reality of wearing the label “caregiver.” As the boomer population continues to age, the number of unsung heroes caring for a family member is on the upswing. According to the report, *Caregiving in the U.S. 2015, there is currently an estimated 34.2 million American adults caring for a loved one 50 years or older.

Caregiving can be overwhelming, both emotionally and physically, bringing with it a myriad of emotions, all of which I experienced at one time or another, including frustration, helplessness, anger, sadness, depression, and guilt. The experience can also be lonely. At times I remember feeling like I was on a deserted island, with nary a person who really understood what it was like.

While speaking at a caregivers meeting recently, two women approached me afterwards to share their stories. One woman told me that her spouse with Alzheimer’s is slowly becoming more than she can handle, but her children are insisting that she keep him at home. The other woman suspects that her elderly father who lives next door to her is showing signs of dementia, but he flatly refuses to go to the doctor. They were both searching for answers. Like growing old, caregiving is not for sissies.

I sensed in these two women what experts label caregiver burnout, a very real phenomenon and the number one reason why it is imperative for all caregivers to recognize the importance of self-care.

If you or someone you know is experiencing the below symptoms, I encourage you to please make time to see a doctor.

  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Social withdrawal
  • Sleeplessness
  • Exhaustion
  • Poor concentration
  • More susceptible to illness

*Caregiving in the U.S. 2015 – A Focused Look at Caregivers of Adults Age 50+ was published by the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) and the AARP Public Policy Institute.


Over the past several months, four other authors from across the country and I have crossed paths, all of us affected in some way by Alzheimer’s disease/dementia. Two watched both their parents’ memories disappear and one is a nurse who was a caregiver for those affected. Another is a granddaughter that was forgotten by her beloved grandpa, and the other is experiencing the disease himself.

For the month of November, the 5 of us have joined together together in recognition of both National Caregiver Appreciation Month and National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month to acknowledge those family caregivers who are unsung heroes. From each other, we learned that all of us felt compelled to write our books, eager to make a difference…hoping that we might make the pathway for others traveling this road a little less painful and lonely.

Check out this commentary for more information on these great books!

Vicki Tapia, long-time lactation consultant and published author of numerous lactation articles, found her energies redirected to the other end of life when both her parents were diagnosed with dementia in 2004. Her diary documenting their journey resulted in the publication of Somebody Stole My Iron: A Family Memoir of Dementia, a 2015 finalist for the High Plains Book Awards. The mother of three grown children and eight grandchildren, Vicki lives with her husband and Mini Schnauzer in South Central Montana.

The Science of Alzheimer’s: Where Are We Going?

The McMaster Health Forum, with support from the Labarge Optimal Aging Initiative, recently hosted a public talk to examine the latest research and evidence into risks, prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. This talk featured presentations by Jay Ingram, one of Canada’s best-known and most popular science personalities, and Dr. Christopher Patterson, an expert on the diagnosis and treatment of dementia.

“My experience is that when you talk to people about Alzheimer’s, they have three questions,” said Ingram. “The first one is always ‘am I going to get it?’ The second is ‘If it looks like I’m likely to get it, what can I do to lower that risk?’ And the third question is ‘if that doesn’t work and I do get it, what are the prospects?’”

Jay Ingram
Photo Credit: McMaster Health Forum

Will I get Alzheimer’s?

Early-onset familial Alzheimer’s

“There are two kinds of Alzheimer’s disease – early onset familial Alzheimer’s, which you inherit and is a dominant gene. If you had a parent with this kind of Alzheimer’s, you have a 50/50 chance of getting it yourself,” said Ingram.

But, he cautioned, “That’s so not the norm. There’s really only three genes that have been absolutely identified as early onset familial genes. They represent something less than 1% of all Alzheimer’s.”

Also, not every case of early-onset Alzheimer’s is genetic.

“Yes, there’s a risk but it’s a very tiny risk. For the most part, I think you could set that aside,” said Ingram.

Late-onset Alzheimer’s

“There’s really only one gene that has been unambiguously associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s (that is 65-70 years old and older),” said Ingram. “It comes in three varieties. One is bad, one is neutral and one is actually beneficial.”

“Let’s say, worst case scenario, I’m carrying two copies of the bad gene called APOE4. The most pessimistic of studies would say that that my risk is now 15-fold greater than it would have been. So you might think I’m terrified, but there are some other facts to consider. About half of the people who have the two bad genes never get Alzheimer’s. Plus, a good percentage doesn’t have those genes and do get it.”

“As far as late-onset, it’s so ambiguous for my money, it’s not worth worrying about.”

What can I do to prevent Alzheimer’s?

“There’s this whole constellation of effects, but when you put them together, I think they boil down to some pretty commonsense things,” said Ingram. “Exercise, watch your weight, watch your blood pressure, engage socially and keep your mind active. These are all sort of commonsense things that one should do in life.”

Education

“Education has been shown to be clearly related to your risk of dementia. The further you go in school, the less likely you are to become demented,” said Ingram. “If you continue on in what is defined as a mentally stimulating job, you’re also better off.”

Exercise

The single most important thing that older adults can do to prevent dementia is to walk 35 or 40 minutes a day.

“Exercise. Why is that important? Cardiovascular health, the health of your circulatory system and, maybe most importantly, your blood pressure are all risk factors, if they’re in decline, for Alzheimer’s disease,” said Ingram.

Be social

“There have been studies that show that it’s not even the kind of activities you do, its the number of them that you engage in and the number of people with whom you engage,” said Ingram.

Other factors

  • There is good epidemiological evidence that people who adhere to a Mediterranean-type diet are least likely to develop Alzheimer’s.
  • People who watch a lot of TV are more likely to become demented.
  • Obesity and diabetes are risk factors for Alzheimer’s

Does having diabetes increase the risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

“If you have diabetes, your risk of developing dementia is about twice that compared to if you don’t have diabetes. Certainly, management of blood sugar is important. Whether that actually changes the progression of the disease, I don’t think we know but we would suspect that it would because appropriate management delays other vascular complications,” said Dr. Patterson.

Can cognitive exercises help improve brain function?

“The evidence for enhancing your memory by doing those memory exercises is not nearly as solid as the evidence for physical activity,” said Ingram.

“The evidence is that, in earlier stages of cognitive impairment, you see improvements in those domains in which you practice. If you do memory tests, it may not necessarily improve executive function,” said Dr. Patterson.

How does dementia impact the quality of life for caregivers?

Dr. Patterson commented that in a research project, in which he was involved, quality of life did not diminish in individuals over different stages of the disease whereas for caregivers it clearly did.

“While we talk about memory loss so much , the most disturbing change to families is not the memory loss but the change of mood or affect or personality. That’s where people feel they’ve lost the person,” added Ingram.

If I do get Alzheimer’s, what can I do about it?

Education 

“Understanding the disease and what’s going to happen to that person overtime is extremely important,” said Dr. Patterson. “Also, learning how to deal with some of the behaviors that may evolve as the disease progresses is by far the most important part of management of individuals with dementia.”

Support

Dr. Patterson highlighted that it is important to recognize “that being a caregiver for an individual with dementia is extremely stressful.”

Case management is a way of supporting families through this journey.

Medications

“Of the whole management of individuals with dementia, medications really play the least part.”

“The single medication that is commonly prescribed these days, will stabilize cognition for 9-12 months,” said Ingram. “As the cells generating neurotransmitters die, to a degree, you can replace them chemically. But, the cells are still dying and eventually you can’t make it up chemically.”

Patients may be prescribed medications to help with other symptoms of the disease.

“In the future, there may be medications that can literally interrupt the sequence of the disease,” said Dr. Patterson.

“So what do we do in the meantime? We can do lots of things that make us healthier and happier people. We hope that with increasing general health, reduction of diabetes, and daily exercise slow down the obesity train. That may be, at least in the short-term, the most effective thing we can do,” said Ingram.

The rest of the summary is available here and the video below presents highlights from the event.

Steven Lott is the Senior Lead, Communications for the McMaster Health Forum. He leads the Forum’s communications initiatives including the dissemination of Forum products and information, coordination of public talks, social media engagement, media relations, and website management. Steven has worked with a variety of patient advocates, non-governmental organizations, think tanks, academics and other health system stakeholders in Canada, USA, South America, Europe and Africa to promote strategic health policies.

Montessori: Changing the Face of Dementia Care

Montessori in Aged Care is a fairly new concept that is picking up momentum in Australia. It revolves around the idea of maintaining independence rather than creating excess disability. Excess disability simply means to increase the dependence of the individual when they can independently complete the activity or task. For example, if an elderly woman can brush her hair, often a staff worker will do it for them with the impression that they are helping, when in actuality they are taking away the resident’s independence. Imagine living in a nursing home away from the comfort of your own home and not being allowed to do the things you enjoy.

Photo Credit: Edwin M Escobar

Montessori in Dementia Care enables individuals to maintain that independence, make choices and boost their self-esteem. It also empowers people to make important contributions and have a meaningful place in their community. The impact of dementia affects the resident in various ways including perception, attention, planning, insight, language, emotions, apathy, behavior, physical function and memory.

Therefore, the Montessori Method offers more choices and opportunities that promote self-determination and individuality to provide the best quality care for all. Here are strategies to provide relevant activities for people with dementia:

  • Take advantage of the known and remembered and use it to create meaningful activities for residents.
  • Offer more social interaction opportunities with people of all ages.
  • Provide more physical activity to keep residents, even those in wheelchair, active such as indoor bowling or ball games.
  • Provide mental stimulation for residents such as crosswords, word games, etc.
  • Utilize music therapy to play familiar music and trigger well-preserved memories and improve quality of life.
  • Delegate roles for different residents, if possible. Responsibility gives residents a sense of purpose.
  • Prepare resources ready to be used to minimize noise and distractions.
  • Know the residents individually: This involves personal history, employment, hobbies, interests and culture.
  • Always have a plan B, C, D, E, F, G because things never go as planned.

In conclusion, I think this new concept of dementia care focuses on the strengths and abilities of people with dementia rather than their condition. Montessori programs provide individuals the opportunity to engage the five senses, such as touch, sight, smell, taste and sound, and stimulate their minds. As success is easily achieved, people are encouraged to focus on tasks at hand. This creates a sense of security and high self-esteem, which contributes to the attainment of a life full of purpose and meaning.

Hazel Dompreh is currently a Diversional/Recreational Therapist at a nursing home in New South Wales, Australia.

 

Technology for the Tech-Shy: Designing New Applications for Older Adults

In the digital and connected world, older adults are seemingly left behind. Tech companies continue to design products that cater to young adults, even in the generation of social media. As phone calls and snail mail are dangerously slow and outdated, why should the elderly not benefit from advances in communication? Fortunately there is a growing number of mobile and tablet applications that cater to the elderly population. These apps help to improve quality of life and communication channels with family, friends and healthcare providers.

For example, Oscar aims to enhance the lives of seniors as well as help seniors keep in touch with their family, friends or caregivers. Oscar is an easy-to-use, remotely managed communication tablet app that allows tech-shy elderly known as the ‘seniors’  to remain connected with family, friends and healthcare professionals known as the ‘juniors’. The app boasts of a simple interface which allows users to communicate via text, pictures, voice and video calls. Additionally, it provides a ‘Live View’ of the application on the elder’s tablet and allows the ‘junior’ to fix or update relevant items remotely. The technology also provides reminders, weather alerts and games. Apart from communication, Oscar is a platform for apps with the possibility of adding or removing applications depending on the user’s proficiency and interest. Keep your eyes peeled for the iOS version that is coming soon!

Photo Credit: Pixabay
Photo Credit: Pixabay

Two finance applications that target the elderly are Mint and Check. Like Oscar, both apps boast of simple interfaces which present relevant financial data in one simplified format. Both applications also provide reminders for paying bills, tracking payments, and helping with creating and managing budgets. A primary difference is that Check is only available on Apple iPads, while Mint is available on both Android and Apple operating systems.

In addition to communication and finances, healthcare is another important consideration with the elderly population. WebMD and Blood Pressure Monitor are great applications, allowing seniors to monitor and learn more about their health. Finally, there are a whole host of games apps to improve cognition and memory such as Luminosity and Elevate. Luminosity focuses on cognitive abilities, while Elevate focuses on reading, writing and mathematics. Both are fun, and we encourage everyone to check them out!

While being acutely aware that some of these apps are only accessible to people with adequate financial resources, such people can invest in mobile applications to remain connected, enlightened and lead an improved quality of life.

Seniors are part of the digital world, hence they should benefit from advances in communication than be left behind. The goal is to design products, free or cost-effective, which will improve the quality of life of older adults. It is, therefore, encouraging to see a number of companies collaborating with seniors to design great products. Since technology can also benefit this population, corporations are recognizing the value and contribution of older adults.

Oscar, Mint, WebMD, etc., have great potential to improve health outcomes among the elderly as well as provide a comfortable and healthy life. The video below shows more useful apps for the elderly.

Namratha Rao is pursuing a MSPH in Social and Behavioral Interventions in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. 

Monthly News Roundup – November 2015

Photo Credit: Alex Proimos
Photo Credit: Alex Proimos

October was a busy month for Global Health Aging. From launching our first article series to hosting a slew of guest writers, the experience has been invaluable. Five new writers joined the team as the goal is to focus equally on each continent. This month, we covered topics like employment, aquatic therapy and mental health, and Zen Hospice Project is the featured company for October. Let’s take a look at what happened this past month!


On the Blog


In the News


October Peer Reviews


Featured Company

Dying happens. To all of us. This is the motto of Zen Hospice Project, a thriving non-profit that helps to change the experience of dying through a human-centered model of care. Since 1987, Zen Hospice has provided support through education programs inspired by their unique service at the bedside. It is through this pioneering model of care that the organization inspires each other to live fully. Zen Hospice creates a space for living that offers the opportunity for individuals, their loved ones and caregivers to find comfort, connection, and healing in this shared human experience. Ultimately, the organization explores how society might provide the best care possible and design a better experience for everyone. If you want more information, visit the website here.


Events


Just for Fun


Keep us informed! Send information and announcements to info@globalhealthaging.org and connect with Global Health Aging on Facebook, LinkedIn, Google Plus, Twitter and YouTube.